A very wubbulous 108th birthday to Theodor Geisel, or Dr Seuss (2 March 1904–24 September 1991), above, in 1959, with characters from his books.  Is there anyone seeing this post who didn’t learn to read with him?
But, of course, in addition to being perhaps the most beloved children’s book author of all time—from 1937’s To Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street to 1990’s Oh, The Places You’ll Go!—he also had a political side, drawing powerful cartoons before and during the Second World War.  He denounced the America First isolationists, consistently singling out their most high-profile spokesman, aviator Charles Lindbergh:

and he never stopped hammering at the dangers of fascism.  A political cartoon from July 8, 1941:

Though German himself, he was a staunch opponent of rampant anti-Semitism:

When I was a little girl, I liked to think of him as a surrogate grandfather. 

A very wubbulous 108th birthday to Theodor Geisel, or Dr Seuss (2 March 1904–24 September 1991), above, in 1959, with characters from his books.  Is there anyone seeing this post who didn’t learn to read with him?

But, of course, in addition to being perhaps the most beloved children’s book author of all time—from 1937’s To Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street to 1990’s Oh, The Places You’ll Go!—he also had a political side, drawing powerful cartoons before and during the Second World War.  He denounced the America First isolationists, consistently singling out their most high-profile spokesman, aviator Charles Lindbergh:

Lindbergh & America First

and he never stopped hammering at the dangers of fascism.  A political cartoon from July 8, 1941:

AF & Hitler

Though German himself, he was a staunch opponent of rampant anti-Semitism:

Lindbergh & Anti-Semitism

When I was a little girl, I liked to think of him as a surrogate grandfather.