Forty-four years ago today, the famed Twentieth Century Limited completed its final run after sixty-five years. Once considered a national institution—and the “Most Famous Train in the World” (that that, Orient Express!)—it even lent its name to a classic screwball comedy, but in the end it fell victim to changing trends in travel.
Below, 1938 service plate from the dining car (in the Met’s design collection), and a glance at the interiors:


And to think we gave up all this for airport full-body scans and highway rest stops.

Forty-four years ago today, the famed Twentieth Century Limited completed its final run after sixty-five years. Once considered a national institution—and the “Most Famous Train in the World” (that that, Orient Express!)—it even lent its name to a classic screwball comedy, but in the end it fell victim to changing trends in travel.

Below, 1938 service plate from the dining car (in the Met’s design collection), and a glance at the interiors:

Dining on the 20th C

And to think we gave up all this for airport full-body scans and highway rest stops.