Further celebrating November 30 as a good birthday for satirists: a salute to Mark Twain (30 November 1835–21 April 1910), also often relegated to the children’s section, but more than capable of wielding “a pen warmed up in Hell.”
As with Swift, Twain’s most famous works of social observation—The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Adventures of Huckleberry Finn—have been dismissed as children’s books, and their complexity has led to library and school challenges.  Reading works like Letters from the Earth, however, or Twain’s opinion pieces on the US war in the Philippines, paints a very different picture of the famed humorist’s geniality.
Below, before his hair and suit turned white:

Google honored your birthday, too:

Further celebrating November 30 as a good birthday for satirists: a salute to Mark Twain (30 November 1835–21 April 1910), also often relegated to the children’s section, but more than capable of wielding “a pen warmed up in Hell.”

As with Swift, Twain’s most famous works of social observation—The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Adventures of Huckleberry Finn—have been dismissed as children’s books, and their complexity has led to library and school challenges.  Reading works like Letters from the Earth, however, or Twain’s opinion pieces on the US war in the Philippines, paints a very different picture of the famed humorist’s geniality.

Below, before his hair and suit turned white:

Mark Twain

Google honored your birthday, too:

Mark Twain