fernsandmoss:

Allen Ginsberg & Friend, photobooth, 1968

I love that GInsberg’s eyes are wide open in that top photo.

fernsandmoss:

Allen Ginsberg & Friend, photobooth, 1968

I love that GInsberg’s eyes are wide open in that top photo.

Piper Laurie and Brian DePalma, behind the scenes of CARRIE (1976).  From this Facebook set.

Piper Laurie and Brian DePalma, behind the scenes of CARRIE (1976).  From this Facebook set.

"Frank’s Daily Commute" quilt on Flickr; detail below.

"Frank’s Daily Commute" quilt on Flickr; detail below.

How did I not know about this place?!? The Bone Chapel in Hallstatt, Austria. The monastery’s tiny graveyard necessitated exhuming the old to bury the new—so, you know: paint the bones.

How did I not know about this place?!? The Bone Chapel in Hallstatt, Austria. The monastery’s tiny graveyard necessitated exhuming the old to bury the new—so, you know: paint the bones.

"The Bum Shop," by R. Delin, London (1785).

"The Bum Shop," by R. Delin, London (1785).

Moonrise highway, Baja, Mexico, from Pinterest.

Moonrise highway, Baja, Mexico, from Pinterest.

Well hey there, li’l buddy! by phil dokas on Flickr.Kawaii oil and vinegar…

Well hey there, li’l buddy! by phil dokas on Flickr.

Kawaii oil and vinegar…

Anna Held—the ultimate Ziegfeld Girl.

Anna Held—the ultimate Ziegfeld Girl.

"Politicians Discussing Global Warming," a sculpture in Berlin, by street artist Isaac Cordal (2011).  
Perfect.

"Politicians Discussing Global Warming," a sculpture in Berlin, by street artist Isaac Cordal (2011).  

Perfect.

Apparently, you’re supposed to be able practically to taste the Fascism in Italian Futurist art, but I just think this is cool: “Speeding Train,” by Ivo Pannaggi, 1922.  
Below, “Elasticity,” by Umberto Boccioni, 1912.

Apparently, you’re supposed to be able practically to taste the Fascism in Italian Futurist art, but I just think this is cool: “Speeding Train,” by Ivo Pannaggi, 1922.  

Below, “Elasticity,” by Umberto Boccioni, 1912.

Presented without comment.

Presented without comment.

A big truth, from Noam Chomsky (May 1992)

RS: Whenever the Times or any other newspaper writes about the destruction of the ozone layer, they present it as this unavoidable tragedy, like an earthquake or a hurricane. Yet the chemistry of what chlorofluorocarbons do to ozone molecules has been known since 1973. Du Pont and our political rulers have been stonewalling, and now we’re in a situation where hundreds of thousands of people are going to die of skin cancer and get cataracts. If these chemicals had been manufactured in Eastern Europe, we’d surely be blaming communism. But the idea that capitalism did this to us…

NC: Did this in its natural workings. Not out of corruption. It did it because what drives the system, and what’s supposed to drive the system, is tomorrow’s profit. People who think about long-term effects are out of the system, by its very nature. And that’s supposed to be a good thing. In the economics literature, future lung cancers are called an ‘externality.’ It doesn’t show up in the market system. When you’re selling chemicals, you’re supposed to be maximizing profits for the shareholders. And if you’re not doing that, it’s immoral. You don’t maximize profits by worrying about people getting cancer in twenty years. If you do worry about that, you won’t be chairman of the board very long. That’s the way the system is built, and it’s admired because of that property. Ask Milton Friedman. If Du Pont had started to worry about the ozone layer and had shifted their resources to deal with it, some could have driven them out of business.

Rolling Stone interview with Noam Chomsky, by Charles M Young, May 28 1992.

Handelskammer Hamburg by rauter25 on Flickr.

This actually feels a lot like some modern comics…lovely!  

Via booksnbuildings

"Matrakçı Nasuh was an Ottoman Renaissance man. He excelled in martial arts, mathematics, science, painting and literature, among other fields. Matrakçı Nasuh’s name, in fact, comes from the word for ‘cudgel’ or ‘mace’ in Ottoman Turkish, matrāḳ, as he was famous for his virtuosity in employing this weapon and creating games and military training involving the mace, as well as other weapons, even writing a work on the art of swordsmanship. 

In addition to his contribution to the writing of history and the creation of games with cudgels, Matrakçı Nasuh was also famous as a technician. The most well-known episode of his engineering talent occurred during the circumcision ceremonies of Süleyman’s sons, Mehmed and Selim, when he famously constructed two moving citadels out of paper from which soldiers emerged and staged a battle, as part of the public spectacle and celebration in the Istanbul hippodrome.

He was also a talented painter and created a new form of art that depicted the topography of cities of the Ottoman Empire with great precision and detail (pictured).”

Read more at the British Library.

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

"Little Deaths," by Ruth Lingford (2010). A wonderful animation detailing the human experience of orgasm.